Is it oviparous?

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Without having the experience of actually raising chickens, we found other ways to explore with eggs.  We put this egg in vinegar.  The kids loved watching it change over time.  From the moment we put it into the liquid, the size appeared to change, then bubbles were everywhere, and depending on the stage things, it would either float or sink.  Eventually, we could see through the shell to the yolk, which was cool.. at that point, I was supposed to take it out and bounce it around, but forgot… so it kept on getting bigger and bigger, fuzzier and fuzzier, until it was a big white explosion.  Not for the faint hearted, but great for the scientist in you and your students.  I loved their excitement each time they walked into the room, exclaiming with excited chatter about the observable changes.

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These are some of the paintings and drawings that we made of oviparous animals this year.

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We made a graph of animals that were oviparous and viviparous.  This was a good resource for information on the difference.

I made cards to go with the presentation that the kids could sort and use to make the graph.  I cut a piece of construction paper in half and had the kids write either… A _____ is oviparous or A _____ is viviparous, depending on the animal they chose, and draw a picture for our graph.  I didn’t take a picture of it at the time, which I regret, because it was a great learning experience and made a nice visual of our learning.

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The concepts of oviparous animals wove through many of our discussions about animals and the cycle of life.  The kids even began to discuss the parallels the noticed between the life cycle of a plant and that of an animal.   We were able to draw analogies between seeds and eggs and life cycles in that way.

Books I recommend for this unit: