The Nurse at School: A Mini-Reader for Kindergarten

 

the nurse at school

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I made these mini-books to help me during the first weeks of school when I am introducing the students to the campus, routines and procedures of kindergarten.

I’ve found that it is important to talk about the nurse and when it is appropriate to visit.

The books use simple, kindergarten friendly text to reinforce my beginning of the year unit, “Welcome to Kindergarten” and my unit on “Community Helpers.”

I also like that students will take the reader home and can talk about the nurse with their family, why the nurse works on campus, when it is important to ask to go, as well as when and why it is not.

I hope that you also find it to be a useful resource in your classroom!

Love, Jenni

 

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I go to the Bathroom at School: Mini-Reader for Kindergarten

i go to the bathroom at school

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Teach the rules and expectations for using the bathroom with this simple reader for students.

Review the importance of respecting the privacy of others, washing hands, being quick and quiet, and more!

This book is a resource to help you during the first weeks of school when we spend much of our day teaching and practicing all of our routines.

I hope that you find it useful!

Love,

Jenni

 

I go to Recess: A Mini-Reader for Kindergarten

 

 

The first weeks of kindergarten are so important!

Everything must be taught, practiced, and reviewed… one step at a time.

You can introduce your students to the rules of recess with this mini-reader.

Students read about going down the slide on their bottom, taking turns on the monkey bars, keeping the sand on the ground, including others, and more!

This is a helpful book to teach routines and procedures during the first weeks as well as a reader that you may return to as the year progresses and expectations are reviewed.

I hope that this book is a helpful resource for you and your students!

Love,

Jenni

 

 

 

 

 

I go to School: mini-reader

Igotoschool

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It seems obvious, but taking the time to help your student navigate their new environment with less anxiety, more independence, and with respect for rules and procedures is very important.

I created this mini-reader to complement my “Welcome to Kindergarten” unit.

Each page has simple text about an area of campus that your students will visit including: the playground, the nurse’s office, the cafeteria, special area classes, and more.

I’m hoping to complete a series of book relating to the rules and procedures for each area of campus as well.  This way we can color and draw in our reader as we learn about our school and practice routines.

I hope you also find this mini-reader to be a helpful teaching tool for you and your classroom.  I know I need all the resources that I can get to help me teach effectively during the first weeks!

With Love,

Jenni

 

If you’re bothered by a friend

In kindergarten, we learn to navigate friendships and our community of learners with independence, kindness, and empathy.

Tattling is a common dilemma in kindergarten as students are developing their sense of what is fair and just and looking for adult assistance to navigate and understand their world.

It is important to differentiate a tattle from a report with your little ones.  Tattling is often about an inflexible sense of rules, attention, and power, whereas reporting is about safety and concern for others.

This little student reader is about handling difficult, bothersome behavior with strategies that promote independence, a healthy sense of self, and personal power.

The pages contain images of situations where tattles often arise, like turn taking and hurtful words, and then gives a concrete strategy of how to handle these situations: walk away, say please stop, just ignore, and finally ask for help.

It is to be used in conjunction with other discussions about the difference between a tattle and a report, when it is important to seek out help from an adult and how to do so.

 if you are bothered

Click on the image to view the book on TpT.

Are seeds alive?

Place a variety of seeds out for your students to examine and ask them if they think the seeds are alive.

Make sure to follow up their responses with more questions… “Why do you think that?  How do you know?”  Change statements into questions.. “I wonder if seeds are not alive because they look like rocks?”

This book explains that seeds are dormant or sleeping, but yes they are alive!

a seed is sleepy book

Click on the image to see more about this book!

But how do we know what is alive?

is it alive pbs video image

Click on the image to view the PBS video.

What makes something alive?

Sesame Street has some good answers to this question!

What are the characteristics of living things?  

Let’s apply what we kow to seeds!

Do seeds need food, air, and water?  Can they grow and change?

Experiment and observe!

Research and learn!

 What about babies?  Can seeds reproduce?

For this answer you have to teach a bit about the life cycle.

Here is a pack about the life cycle of seeds and seed germination that will help you and your students explore this topic in depth!

PBIS Topics: Dealing with Disappointment

disappointed

When we are little it is hard to understand and process disappointment.  As adults, who love and care for our students, we want to protect our children from this experience as much as we can.  However, learning how to cope with disappointment and regulate our emotions is important to our children’s growth and development.
Helping children identify and normalize feelings of disappointment is good practice as a teacher.  Identifying the emotion of disappointment and events that trigger these feelings  helps children to understand and regulate their emotions.
Children in kindergarten often feel disappointed when they don’t get to be first, when they have to take turns with a prized toy, when they do not win a game, or have to wait.  “I wanted the pink cupcake!!”
disappointed wanted to win
Having clear procedures in place that you have practiced and made routine is the first defender against disappointment.   However, it is also important to identify and acknowledge events that trigger disappointment in our young children.  Let your students know that it is normal to feel disappointed.
It is also important for students to learn that they have a choice to make when they feel disappointed.  Teach your children that they can choose to be calm.
disappointed choice
Regular practice with self regulation strategies gives our children the power to use these tools and strategies when they need them most!
disappointed calm
Teach healthy strategies for dealing with disappointment:
  • Deep breathing:  Teach students to “Smell the cookies through their nose and blow out the candles through their mouth.”  Practice this breathing technique regularly, so that when disappointment strikes, your students know what to do!
  • Take a break:  Teach students to take a short break when they feel disappointment.
    Students can take a walk, get a drink, or squeeze a stress ball.
  • Have a quiet area in the room where students can sit with a pillow or read a book for a few minutes.  I have a box in the room filled with social stories about behavior that we have already read as a class.  These are great reading choices for the students when they need a break because they are filled with reminders on how to make the right choice.
  • Make sure to choose strategies that you can manage as a teacher and set limits on what is an acceptable choice during a break.  For instance, my students suggested playing with toys as a way to calm themselves, so we talked that through.  “Why do you think playing with toys might not be a good way to calm yourself when you are disappointed?”  The students were spot on with their answer, “Because you might break them when you are really upset.”
  • Have a safe seat:  When a student is not able to regulate their emotions and has erupted in a fit of disappointment, it is important to have a safe seat in the room where their behavior can be contained and ignored while you continue on with instruction in the classroom.  Depending on the level of escalation, you may need a plan to remove the student from the room.  Especially if they are in danger of damaging property, hurting themselves or others.  It is important to work closely with your intervention team, the school psychologist, and your administration when a child escalates to such a high degree.

disappointment red

Sometimes a student looks like they have calmed down, only to reengage with requests for you, the teacher, to sooth or “fix it” by giving the child what they wanted.  “Can I have it now!?”  Often a child will escalate again when the request is denied, because they have not truly worked through their feelings of disappointment and arrived at a place of calm.  Trying to fix things when a child is upset takes away their opportunity to learn to deal with disappointment in healthy ways.

Once some time has passed, your student is calm and has moved on, it is important to let them know how proud you are of them for making good choices.  “I like the way you took deep breaths and chose to be calm. Thank you.”

disappointment choose to be calm

Load up on social stories and children’s books that deal with topics of disappointment.  Here are some good titles to get you started:

I also made a simple social story to read to my class about disappointment.  Reading this book has helped all my students identify their feelings, behaviors, and regulate their emotions of disappointment.  They know now that they have a choice and they have tools to help them make that choice.
disappointed
Click on the image to see the story on TpT.

 

PBIS

Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports

  
Our school accomym is B.E.S.T. 

Be Safe

Exhibit Excellence

Show Respect

Take Responsibility

We are working towards fun Friday by earning letters for our rules! Every time I see a student being safe this week, i.e. walking in line, keeping there hands to themselves, sitting on their bottom, we earn a letter on our pizza pie pan!

The letters move up as we work our way to Friday and I get to emphasize and review and thank my students for best behaviors along the way!

Next week we’ll focus on exhibiting excellence in our work!🙂