TRANSITIONS: KINDERGARTEN FIRST WEEKS

transitionsThe first weeks of kindergarten are tough!  There are so many different routines and procedures to teach and practice.

This simple read-a-loud, mini-reader, and task card can help you teach your students how to transition from one activity to another at school.

Also included are a behavior contract and incentive chart for individual students that may need extra help with transitions.

Happy teaching!!

Love,

Jenni

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IF YOU ARE BOTHERED

bothered

Help your students navigate bothersome behavior with greater independence and fewer tattles using these strategies.

The illustrations include the bothersome behavior and the changed behavior when one of the strategies is used.  I hope you find this resource to be beneficial to you and your students.  Click on the images to see more on my Teachers pay Teachers site.

Love,

Jenni

I RAISE MY HAND: FIRST WEEKS

i raise my hand

Introduce and practice the procedure of raising your hand with this resource.

Included is a full color book for the teacher.

A reader for students to read and color.

 

As well as display and task cards.

This series helps you teach the rules and routines of kindergarten.  I use it to establish procedures and spark discussion.

“Why do we raise our hand?”

“Why is it hurtful to blurt?”

The student reader is also a nice communication to send home, so that parents are part of the conversation and know the classroom expectations for behavior.

I hope you enjoy!  Click on any of the images to see the full resource on my Teachers pay Teachers site.

Love,

Jenni

I GO TO RECESS: FIRST WEEKS OF KINDERGARTEN

i go to recess

The first weeks of kindergarten are all about teaching routines and procedures.

This resource will help you teach the rules of the playground with simple pictures and text.

Included in this pack you will find a full color reader for teachers.

A mini-reader for students to read and color.

As well as task and display cards.

I have used these in my own classroom and find that they help introduce procedures, but also guide our discussions about the how and why of our rules.  The student reader is also a nice resource to send home to parents, so they are also included in the discussion about rules.

Click on any of the images to see more on my Teachers pay Teachers site!

Happy Teaching!

Love,

Jenni

Teaching Library Skills to Kinders

Teach your students the basics of library skills with these simple mini-readers.

 

best title

borrowing title

at the library title

parts of a book title

Click on the images to see more on Teachers pay Teachers.

These readers include a full size and full color reader for the the teacher to read a-loud to the class as well as display cards in black-line and color.  These readers help introduce young children to the library.  They learn about basic procedures and library rules as well as the joy of reading, learning, and sharing books at the library!

 

I Raise my Hand at School: A Mini-Reader for Kindergarten

I raise my hand

Click on the image to see more.

Introduce rules and procedures with this series of mini-readers.

Students learn to raise their hand when they have a question, to share ideas, and to ask for help.  They also learn that it is hurtful to interrupt when others are talking or waiting their turn.

Students learn that they can be happy when the teacher calls on them and when the teacher calls on a friend.  They do not always get a turn and can wait for next time.

It is good manners to raise your hand!

Love,  Jenni

 

 

PBIS Topics: Dealing with Disappointment

disappointed

When we are little it is hard to understand and process disappointment.  As adults, who love and care for our students, we want to protect our children from this experience as much as we can.  However, learning how to cope with disappointment and regulate our emotions is important to our children’s growth and development.
Helping children identify and normalize feelings of disappointment is good practice as a teacher.  Identifying the emotion of disappointment and events that trigger these feelings  helps children to understand and regulate their emotions.
Children in kindergarten often feel disappointed when they don’t get to be first, when they have to take turns with a prized toy, when they do not win a game, or have to wait.  “I wanted the pink cupcake!!”
disappointed wanted to win
Having clear procedures in place that you have practiced and made routine is the first defender against disappointment.   However, it is also important to identify and acknowledge events that trigger disappointment in our young children.  Let your students know that it is normal to feel disappointed.
It is also important for students to learn that they have a choice to make when they feel disappointed.  Teach your children that they can choose to be calm.
disappointed choice
Regular practice with self regulation strategies gives our children the power to use these tools and strategies when they need them most!
disappointed calm
Teach healthy strategies for dealing with disappointment:
  • Deep breathing:  Teach students to “Smell the cookies through their nose and blow out the candles through their mouth.”  Practice this breathing technique regularly, so that when disappointment strikes, your students know what to do!
  • Take a break:  Teach students to take a short break when they feel disappointment.
    Students can take a walk, get a drink, or squeeze a stress ball.
  • Have a quiet area in the room where students can sit with a pillow or read a book for a few minutes.  I have a box in the room filled with social stories about behavior that we have already read as a class.  These are great reading choices for the students when they need a break because they are filled with reminders on how to make the right choice.
  • Make sure to choose strategies that you can manage as a teacher and set limits on what is an acceptable choice during a break.  For instance, my students suggested playing with toys as a way to calm themselves, so we talked that through.  “Why do you think playing with toys might not be a good way to calm yourself when you are disappointed?”  The students were spot on with their answer, “Because you might break them when you are really upset.”
  • Have a safe seat:  When a student is not able to regulate their emotions and has erupted in a fit of disappointment, it is important to have a safe seat in the room where their behavior can be contained and ignored while you continue on with instruction in the classroom.  Depending on the level of escalation, you may need a plan to remove the student from the room.  Especially if they are in danger of damaging property, hurting themselves or others.  It is important to work closely with your intervention team, the school psychologist, and your administration when a child escalates to such a high degree.

disappointment red

Sometimes a student looks like they have calmed down, only to reengage with requests for you, the teacher, to sooth or “fix it” by giving the child what they wanted.  “Can I have it now!?”  Often a child will escalate again when the request is denied, because they have not truly worked through their feelings of disappointment and arrived at a place of calm.  Trying to fix things when a child is upset takes away their opportunity to learn to deal with disappointment in healthy ways.

Once some time has passed, your student is calm and has moved on, it is important to let them know how proud you are of them for making good choices.  “I like the way you took deep breaths and chose to be calm. Thank you.”

disappointment choose to be calm

Load up on social stories and children’s books that deal with topics of disappointment.  Here are some good titles to get you started:

I also made a simple social story to read to my class about disappointment.  Reading this book has helped all my students identify their feelings, behaviors, and regulate their emotions of disappointment.  They know now that they have a choice and they have tools to help them make that choice.
disappointed
Click on the image to see the story on TpT.